Tag Archives: development

On The Evolution Of DevOps

The role of the DevOps 2.0 software method in a development environment and larger business organization is not without its value or challenges. Victoria Livschitz, CEO of Qubell, discussed this and how IT organizations can automate and streamline the process, tapping into the value of DevOps 2.0 while helping to elevate some of the challenges. I participated in the conversation regarding where and how I’ve seen the automation process in action and what it has brought to technology environments I’ve participated in. The evolution of DevOps, and its increased efficiency since the early days of waterfall development, has been significant. With the advent and proliferation of cloud-based architectures, development organizations are now facing new challenges and needs in DevOps environments that are unique to the present and play a significant role for the future. While there have been new innovations and tools that have improved the development cycle significantly, enabling teams to bring up and test environments quickly and efficiently, there is still a need for improvement. With large organizations operating complex products across multiple platforms, there are far more variables than simple deployment – it is a configuration management challenge as well. It includes being able to self-serve across every step of the innovation and development process with both ease and reliability. The conversation is an insightful look into the current DevOps environment and what IT leaders and managers should be exploring for the future within their own organization. You can view the discussion here.

Apple On App Rejection

There is an interesting article about app rejection by Apple that is being shared and discussed online this week. Creating a technology product is of course a great deal of work, time, planning. Often in the big scope of projects, small elements can be overlooked, or missed. While the information Apple has shared might seem basic, it’s a great read for anyone who creates technology products. 

Managing The Product Development Lifecycle

As seasoned engineers and executives know, developing a technology product doesn’t begin and end with the product team. Creating a website, app, hardware or software product involves an intensive effort on the part of multiple departments within an organization, with the project manager or team at the helm. Even with years of experience, executives leading the creation, updates, scale or management of a technology product can endure dozens of scenarios that can delay the effort, and in some cases, significantly increase costs.

Below are a few personal lessons learned on the frontlines:

1. Put discovery as the focus first. It can be easy to assume that a project will go as planned, even with the estimate of issues or problems baked into project timeline. CEOs and executive team members may put the pressure on for hard dates and deliverables during initial discussions and scope of the project. But do not make any conclusions until you’ve taken a thorough assessment of every element you might be faced with. This can mean asking questions about priorities and trade off given constraints such as budget, time and resource availability. Find out all you can from every corner of the organization. Then, set your course.

2. Be clear on what’s possible. Once you’ve worked through the variables of the project, it’s time to get clear on what is and isn’t possible. This might sound like a ‘no brainer’ for most executives, but we’ve all felt pressure to set ambitious goals. There’s nothing wrong with aiming high in product development, providing that you’re honest about what is possible. Set realistic, attainable goals. This goes beyond what you think is possible for your team, to what is realistic for every department in the company which requires clear internal communications between teams. While you can’t speak for the leadership in marketing or business development, asking questions as noted above and factoring them into what is possible in terms of the product’s development can be important.

3. Identify and alert teams of anticipated delays immediately. Product development is a bit like a train in that whatever the engine does, the cars will ultimately do as well. Never take potential issues or red flags lightly — and cascade these issues or potential delays to the entire team immediately. It’s a good practice to stay true even when you’re not 100% sure something might go wrong. Measurable and frequent milestones are necessary along the way. Alerting the CEO or other leaders in the company of the potential issue doesn’t mean the process will be derailed, but rather adjusted. This will help everyone from all sides of the company to be more agile and prepared which keeps things running smoothly and on budget whether issues and delays arrive or not.

It’s also important to remember that great products come from great teams, and great teams are created by good leadership. Be prepared to ready and support your team. This is demonstrated through small and large gestures, from buying pizzas when everyone’s working late, to ensuring that you set the pace, professionalism and process by example.